Date of Award

8-1957

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Master of History

Abstract

Texas has never been without the adventurous influence of frontier life. The cowboy and cattleman have been the men who most persistently pushed the frontier farther west, preparing the way to civilization. They are American tradition. Their deeds and adventure are kept vivid in our memory by the mass media of communication aided by the clothing industry and the yearly rodeo. The indoctrination begins at an early age with cowboy boots and the sombrero, This is true without regard to race or color.

Problem

The problem of this study arises out of the fact that though many books have been written about the cowboy and cattleman by scholars of the West and Southwest, specific studies made of many of these books show a tendency, even when the opportunity is presented by the existence of data, to overlook or minimize the significance or even existence of the Negro cattleman and cowboy. In many instances, the Negro cowboy was closely associated with the white barons whose life histories were recorded. The part that is authoritatively known to have involved Negro cowhands, who later became barons in their own right, was omitted.

Committee Chair/Advisor

George R. Woolfolk

Publisher

Prairie View Agricultural and Mechanical College

Rights

© 2021 Prairie View A & M University

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Date of Digitization

10/1/2021

Contributing Institution

John B Coleman Library

City of Publication

Prairie View

MIME Type

Application/PDF

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