Date of Award

8-1964

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Master of Physical Education

Abstract

Throughout the years there have been questions concerning the heart size and heart rate of an athlete. It has been discussed by some persons that through constant training and competition the athlete's heart would increase in size and this may lead to undue cardiac strain ultimately resulting in circulatory damage. This, however, is contradictory because not all athletes have large hearts though many first-class performers who excel, in feats of physical endurance do. "The heart of a physically well-trained man has a slower resting rate, increases less as a result of exercise, and recovers more rapidly after exercise than the heart of a healthy untrained man.

"Physiological factors such as body form, quality of skelto-muscular tissues, adiposity, along with social and economic influence may effect the size of the heart.

The size of even the largest hearts of first-class athletes never exceeds the well-defined magnitude of physiological measurements. This feature distinguishes it clearly from pathological enlargements such as are commonly encountered in cardiac patients* In the latter group, hearts much larger than those present in champion athletes are seen. Such cardiac patients often but not always, show a critical decline of physical efficiency, in sharp contrast to the high exercise tolerance of well-trained athletes.

Committee Chair/Advisor

Curtis Moods

Committee Member

Herman Johnson

Committee Member

Hoover Wight

Publisher

Prairie View Agricultural And Mechanical College

Rights

© 2021 Prairie View A & M University

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Date of Digitization

4/15/2022

Contributing Institution

John B Coleman Library

City of Publication

Prairie View

MIME Type

Application/PDF

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