Date of Award

8-1966

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Master of Biology

Abstract

Animal nutritional studies have led to the discovery that vitamin B2 (RIBOFLAVIN) is one of the essential factors for normal growth and development. The best known function of riboflavin is that it combines with phosphoric acid and protein to form tissue respiratory enzymes which control some of the oxidations involved in the life processes of the tissue. It is also considered to be necessary for the maintenance of the defensive powers of the organism. Lack of vitamin B2 will result in a delay of wound healing, aggravation of minor injuries, and the excretion of negligible amounts of it in the urine. Although it is predominantly excreted in the feces, a smaller amount is also excreted in the urine. While vitamin B2 is excreted mainly in the free form the quantity varies greatly. Riboflavin deficiencies are reflected in either of two conditions: CHELIOSIS, which is cracking of the lips at the corners of the mouth, or vascularization of the ordinarily avascular cornea, which involves the pentration of capillary loops into the cornea.

An increase in the riboflavin intake of humans increases the urinary output of riboflavin since tissue require only small amounts of the vitamin and an excess creates tissue saturation. There has been obtained no evidence that saturation of the tissues with riboflavin improves health or is required. Hence, excessive intake of the vitamin will increase its presence in urine.

The purpose of this investigation is to determine the effect of stress, specifically surgery, on the amount of riboflavin excreted in human urine.

This investigation is limited to the determination of amounts of riboflavin present in the urine of two hospital patients, before surgery and after surgery, using the urine of a normal person as a control. It has been observed that more riboflavin is excreted in the urine of patients with severe burns and after surgical procedures where protein losses indicate cellular decomposition (Wohl and Goodhart, 1964).

Committee Chair/Advisor

Phillip L. Young

Publisher

Prairie View A&M College

Rights

© 2021 Prairie View A & M University

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Date of Digitization

3-14-2022

Contributing Institution

John B Coleman Library

City of Publication

Prairie View

MIME Type

Application/PDF

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.