Date of Award

5-1950

Document Type

Undergraduate Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science

Department

Mechanic Arts

Abstract

Printing is commonly divided into five periods or eras of development. They are the Era of Beginning to 1397; The Gutenbury Era, 1397-1468; The Typographic Era, 1468-1620; The Early Journalism Era, 1620-1804; and the Mechanical Era since 1804. The Era mentioned above, of course, is speaking of letterpress printing only; but, if you will note on the chart that is to follow, you will see that lithographic offset came into existence during the Journalistic Era, which was about five centuries behind letterpress printing. The five Eras are the natural division of progress in the evolution of printing. Each marked by new inventions which made possible the increased production of printing coupled with the increased demand fro printing. To a large extent, this demand was the direct result of printing itself which increased the desire for learning. It has been claimed that the craft of letterpress printing is the medium which turned the darkness of the middle ages whose light, which secured to posterity the intellectual achievements of the past, and which furnished to civilization a means of recording all future progress.

Committee Chair/Advisor

W.H. Stickney

Committee Member

L.B. James

Committee Member

L.B. James

Publisher

Prairie View State Normal And Industrial College

Rights

© 2021 Prairie View A & M University

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Date of Digitization

7/29/2021

Contributing Institution

John B Coleman Library

City of Publication

Prairie View

MIME Type

Application/PDF

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