Date of Award

5-2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education Leadership

Abstract

This research study design was to investigate the impact of teachers' integration of technology into mathematics classrooms on the mathematical performance of African- American high school students. Since high school mathematics teachers should now be adept at integrating technology into mathematics classrooms, there is a need to gauge their perception of its effectiveness in enhancing the mathematical performance of their African-American students.

The participants were 31 general education high school Algebra I mathematics teachers from seven high schools in a large southeastern Texas school district. The conceptual framework that triggered this investigation was the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) model which linked teachers' technological knowledge (TK), content knowledge (CK), and their pedagogical knowledge (PK). Consequently, the study investigated the impact of TPACK on the STAAR Algebra I EOC exam for first-year African-American students.

Specifically, the researcher used multiple linear regression to answer the following research questions: 1. What is the impact of the teachers' level of technological knowledge (TK), content knowledge (CK), and pedagogical knowledge (PK) on the mathematical performance of African-American and non-African American high school students? 2. What is the impact of the teachers' level of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), technological content knowledge (TCK), and technologically pedagogical knowledge (TPK) on the mathematical performance of African-American and non-African American high school students? 3. What is the impact of the teachers' level of TPACK on the mathematical performance of African-American and non-African American high school students?

The results of this study indicated that no meaningful relationships existed for any of the three hypotheses tested for both African-American and non-African American ninth graders. This result is significant in that it is now known that a need exists to review other options for determining how to review the implementation of technology in ninth grade mathematics classrooms.

The findings resulting from this study were beneficial in providing empirical evidence that could likewise certify which combination of technological knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and content knowledge best facilitates mathematics learning for African-American students.

Committee Chair/Advisor

Douglas Hermond

Committee Member

Carl Gardiner

Committee Member

Myrna Cintron

Publisher

Prairie View A&M University

Rights

© 2021 Prairie View A & M University

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Date of Digitization

7-13-2021

Contributing Institution

John B Coleman Library

City of Publication

Prairie View

MIME Type

Application/PDF

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